millionreasons: (pankhurst)
Well this is frightfully embarrassing. Skim-reading through the FF reviews, I noticed that I had saved Number 13 as a draft but didn't post it. Oops. Here it is:

I saw Gallon Drunk supporting PJ Harvey and was fairly unimpressed. And back before richardbajor resigned from indie, he used to put on gigs at Euston Rails (now the Doric Arch - the raised bit at the back was the stage), many of them featuring Terry Edwards doing a solo trumpet set, and I didn't dig that so much either.

But I rather like Some Fool's Mess, it zips along with its tight 12 bar blues bass and drums. It's old fashioned rock and roll with goth singing. Nick Cave approves this song.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
A fitting end - this song does sum up 1991, or at least the final few months of it when I used to go to Newcastle University’s indie disco of a Friday night. The last one before Xmas had everyone in the room bounding along to it, a great moment (later on, when Credit To the Nation released Unity (Call It What You Want), students used to rush onto the dance-floor, only to realise too late that it wasn’t' Smells Like Teen Spirit).

The song suffers from over-use, but the bit where the drums come in is still amazing.



I didn't quite enjoy doing this review run down as much as 1989's, perhaps because I wasn't so much in tune with indie as I had been two years previously. Plus, some gems aside, music wasn't that great in 1991, too much shoegaze, and too much repetition in this FF - it's quite difficult to say something new about the fourth Babes In Toyland song or the sixth Fall.

I was also quite annoyed to find out, several songs in, that Peel didn't bother to play this Festive Fifty because he thought it was dull. A bit like a president not liking the results of an election, so ignoring it. But I think I will do 1992 next year because, Suede aside, it looks pretty good.
millionreasons: (pankhurst)
PJH burst into 1992 with the angry yowl that was Dry and Dress was the first single off of it, released this year. I was entranced by her, by her songs of cruel boyfriends, dresses that make you into another person (one you don't necessarily want to be), and sexual discomfort were far more relateable than Hole's teenage whores. She was Sylvia Plath in popular song. Polly was 22 when this was released. TWENTY-TWO.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
More gothy beats. Somehow, it feels Xmassy: it makes me think of black plastic Christmas trees, mistletoe with blood stains, a roast turkey that wriggles, Eraserhead style. Carol singers should add this to their repertoire. Bad bad Santa.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
The final Fall song, Edinburgh Man, finds our hero (MES) in a mellow, janglesome, somewhat out-of-tune mood. Ah, I love Edinburgh; I would be quite happy to live there if it wasn't for a) the winter b) August, so I loved watching this video. I just turned the sound down a bit.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
I prefer Starsign to The Concept, in terms of melody, pace, beat, and, um concept.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
30 songs later, The Concept is Teenage Fanclub's second entry into the FF. It's OK, isn't it? I find it hard to say anything, either positive or negative, about the Teenage Fannies. It plods along melodically, has a rawk geetar solo and feels just a little bit....inauthentic. Lots of 90s hair in the video.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
Would Hole exist nowadays? Whereas there are more female artists than ever before colonising the charts, girl-bands and angry women seem to have deserted the popscene - it's all whimsy and quirk nowadays. Anyway, Burn Black is another spite-fest, an angry retch at everything, albeit with some delicate guitar bits.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
Like the last Fall song, this Wedding Present tune sounds like lots of other Wedding Present songs (particularly Bewitched). Dalliance tells the tale of a woman messing Gedge around yet again (although from what I've heard, it's usually the other way about). After all she's done, he still wants to kiss her. Heart: melted.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
No, A Lot Of Wind is not the final Fall song of the 1991 Festive Fifty. This song sounds like many, many other Fall songs (I’m singing/grunting Mollusc in Tyrol along with it), and I like it.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
Yeah. Love this. Much prefer Hole pre-Kurt death. When it was all kinderwhore and screechy songs. This song is the ultimate I-hate-you-mom-and-dad, although reading about Love's childhood, it seemed she had good reason. I used to think it was about the uselessness of accumulation ("I wanted that shirt and I wanted those pants"), but maybe I was wrong.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
What the flip are Primal Scream doing here? Surely their time of being, um, Higher Than The Sun, was early 1990 when the whole appalling indie-dance genre was hip? They must have been milking the last possible singles off of Screamadelica. Now, I don't mind Loaded (although I preferred it when it was called I'm Losing More Than I Ever Had, when it was pre-Weatheralled), but I hate the hippy dippy shite of Come Together and this is just mumbling indulgent nonsense. It brings to mind Mandelbrot set posters in student halls of residence and let's cut lectures and smoke a joint, yeah? If I'm ever diagnosed with a fatal disease, instead of going to Disneyland, I will go round to Bobby Gillespie's house (it's just off Newington Green) and hold a boom-box over my head playing Sonic Flower Groove, screaming: "Do you remember this, Bobby? DO YOU?!"

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
Dare is traditional Wedding Present fare in so much as the intro has Gedge coming in a bar before the instruments, there are banging guitars and a louder than bombs geetar solo, a jamming bass, desperate romanticism: "Look how we tremble when we kiss/One day soon we'll laugh at this!" It is not the last Weddoes song in the FF.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
There's some things in music that I'm a sucker for. Bridges, 3/4 time, girl/boy duets, Phil Spector drums (boom ba boom tish), call and response. So the excellent bass and guitar C&R (bum ba bum ba bum ba BAM BAM) makes up for Gedge's drone, the rawk guitar solo and the slight monotony of Fleshworld.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
I was wrong about Slint. Apparently, people who were born after 1980 have heard of them - they play regularly at ATP and other festivals. This is why I don’t care for ATP and other festivals, it’s always bands from 1991 there. Anyway, I was wrong about Slint, but I’m sure no-one under 35 remembers Catherine Wheel, very much of their time. Now I'll probably find out that they are to nu-gazers as The Velvet Undergound are to indies, or something. NB This song goes on far longer than necessary.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)

The words to Drain You sounds like an entry on a misheard lyrics tumblr site.  "I travel through a tube and end up in your infection/Chew your meat for you, pass it back and forth/In a passionate kiss from my mouth to yours/I like you"

But it pootles along very nicely - I love the ferocity of the drums and the buh-buh of the guitars after each verse. Nirvana were always more about melodies than lyrics to me, and the tune stays in my head a long time after the song has finished.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
Moose. The also-ran of shoegaze. I like mooses (or is it meese?) but this band is boring. BORING. B-o-r-i-n-g. I wonder if the people who voted for Suzanne still rate it.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
The final Babes In Toyland entry. Short and sour, it sounds like it's the song that launched a thousand riot grrrls.

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
There is a list of 100 best shoegaze albums. To my surprise, the Boo Radleys are on it. As I mostly remember them for the pop of Wake Up Boo, I had forgotten that they sounded like Secret Shine for a while. The Finest Kiss is shoegaze to the max.

Other TKAMB-related bands are available: The Mockingbirds, Harper Lee,,,,surely there must be a Brooklyn band called Jem and Scout?

millionreasons: (pankhurst)
The early 90s was looking for a new genre. Baggy was over, grunge was nascent, the floor was wide open for shoegaze. Ride, Cocteau Twins, MBV, Chapterhouse, Slowdive. Spiritualised, Slowdive did a 12 minute song that took up the A side of a 12" record (and half of one side of a C90): it was like punk never happened. I have a home-made shoegaze CD that I play if I want to be drugged by sweet sounds into sleep but I can't imagine buying an album or going to see them play live (no doubt they've reformed. Everyone has reformed). Catch The Breeze is probably one of Slowdive's better mellow, wibbly guitarscapes and it's only 4 and a half minutes long, although you suspect it could've gone on for another 5 or 6 minutes if they'd had their way.

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